x
Breaking News
More (3) »

WZDX

US stocks rally on hopes for vaccine and economic recovery

Stocks were already headed for a higher opening when a drug company announced encouraging results in very early testing of an experimental coronavirus vaccine.

The stock market bounced back from its worst week in nearly two months Monday as optimism about a potential vaccine for the coronavirus and hopes for a U.S. economic recovery in the second half of the year put investors in a buying mood.

The S&P 500 climbed 3.2%, its best day since early April. The gains erased all of its losses from last week, when the index posted its worst showing since late March and its third weekly loss in the last four. Bond yields rose broadly in another sign that investors were becoming more optimistic.

Stocks were already headed for a higher opening on Wall Street when a drug company announced encouraging results in very early testing of an experimental coronavirus vaccine. The stock of the company, Massachusetts-based Moderna, jumped 20%.

Investors were also encouraged by remarks over the weekend from Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, who expressed optimism that the U.S. economy could begin to recover in the second half of the year. Once the outbreak has been contained, he said, the economy should be able to rebound “substantially.”

The S&P 500 gained 90.21 points to 2,953.91. The benchmark index is still down 12.8% from its all-time high on February 19.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 911.95 points, or 3.9%, to 24,597.37. The Nasdaq composite rose 220.27 points, or 2.4%, to 9,234.83. Small-company stocks fared better than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 index picked up 76.70 points, or 6.1%, to 1,333.69.

Investors are hoping that a working vaccine for COVID-19 can be developed and that it will help reassure people and businesses as the economy reopens.

“The question of how quickly people come back, or will they come back to the way they used to do things, that’s much different if you have a vaccine,” said Megan Horneman, director of portfolio strategy at Verdence Capital Advisors.

Traders are also encouraged that, so far at least, there hasn't been a lot of data implying the reopening of the economy is going to lead to a resurgence in the number of COVID-19 cases, said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at CFRA.

“Of course, because we are responding to impressions, we could end up giving back some of these gains should additional information contest our beliefs," he said.

Credit: AP
The NYSE's honorary Closing Bell ringers are firefighters Luke O'Neill, Travis Wolf, Dominic Piccola, Josh Hallmark, Thomas Reiser, Rick Stewart, Erik Hood and Robert Junker, of Pittsburgh Fire Bureau Station Number 6 in Lawrenceville/Bloomfield, who bravely stand on the front line and always answer the call.

Technology, financial and industrial stocks accounted for a big slice of the broad gains, along with companies that rely on consumer spending. Energy stocks also rose as the price of U.S. crude oil closed above $30 a barrel for the first time in two months. Oil production cuts are kicking in at the same time that demand is rising as the U.S. and other countries ease some of the restrictions aimed at stemming the spread of the outbreak.

RELATED: Stocks are going up and so are unemployment numbers. Here's why

RELATED: As demand increases, expect metro Atlanta gas prices to do the same

Benchmark U.S. crude oil for June delivery jumped 8.1% to settle at $31.82 a barrel. July Brent crude oil, the international standard, vaulted 7.1% to $34.81 a barrel.

Bonds yields rose, another sign that pessimism was diminishing. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, a benchmark for interest rates on many consumer loans, rose to 0.72% from 0.64% late Friday.

Fears of a crushing recession due to the coronavirus sent the S&P 500 into a skid of more than 30% from its high in February. Hopes for a relatively quick rebound and unprecedented moves by the Federal Reserve and Congress to stem the economic pain fueled a historic rebound for stocks in April.

May got off to a downbeat start as investors balance cautious optimism of a recovery as economies around the world slowly open up again against worries that the moves could lead to another surge in coronavirus infections and more economic uncertainty. But Monday's strong start to the week reversed all of the market's losses so far this month.

“We had a near 30% advance from the March 23 low to April 17, and then basically treaded water for a month as investors were expecting some sort of a retest of the prior low, which obviously did not come,” Stovall said. “Usually, markets need to catch their breath after a sprint higher.”

Wall Street is hoping that the reopening of businesses and the relaxation of stay-at-home mandates continue without any major setbacks, paving the way for corporate profits to bounce back.

Europe has been taking steps to reopen its economy more widely, and so far, new infections and deaths have slowed considerably across the continent. Some countries there started easing lockdowns a month ago and even the harshest shutdowns — such as those in Italy and Spain — have loosened significantly.

Markets in Europe also notched strong gains Monday. The FTSE 100 in London rose 4.3% and the DAX in Frankfurt climbed 5.7%. France's CAC 40 rose 5.2%. Markets in Asia finished broadly higher.