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Huntsville Kidney Walk 2021 goes virtual to raise money for dialysis patients in need

AKF works to provide education, support and financial assistance to kidney dialysis patients in need of assistance.
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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — The 2021 Huntsville Kidney Walk Celebration, hosted by the Alabama Kidney Foundation, will take place virtually on May 1.

According to the foundation, Alabama ranks first in the number of dialysis patients per capita in the U.S. AKF said that more than 1,000 Alabamians are currently waiting for a kidney transplant.

AKF works to provide education, support and financial assistance to kidney dialysis patients in need of assistance. 

The Huntsville Kidney Walk will feature a socially distanced, drive-by celebration in which participants can pick up their t-shirts and walk numbers or make a financial donation.

“While this year’s event will look a bit different from years past, we couldn’t be more excited for our first-ever virtual walk, and we encourage families, friends and workplaces to register a team,” said AKF North Alabama Regional Director JoHelene Patrick. “The walk is vital to the mission of AKF and to helping kidney patients in our state get the resources, education and support they need.” 

The foundation said it saw an increase in need in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. AKF served more than 1,000 Alabamians in 2020 and provided more than $700,000 in assistance.

“Cindy and I are thrilled for Thompson Gray Together and G2-  Gray Gives to partner with AKF for such a great cause that directly impacts the lives of Alabamians,” said Ron Gray. “We hope that the Tennessee Valley community walks alongside us and celebrates with us on May 1. We promise it will be a safe and enjoyable event for all.” 

Those interested in participating in the walk can register until May 1, the day of the event. For more information or to sign up, visit the event's website.

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