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Museums to check out for Black History Month

All month long, the National Museum of African American History and Culture is celebrating Black History. If you aren't able to get your hands on tickets for the popular museum, here are just a few ideas of other off the beaten path museums to check out.

All month long, the National Museum of African American History and Culture is celebrating Black History. If you aren't able to get your hands on tickets for the popular museum, here are just a few ideas of other off the beaten path museums to check out.

Alexandria Black History Museum "is devoted to exhibiting local and regional history, incorporates the Robert H. Robinson Library as one of two exhibition galleries. The Robert H. Robinson Library was originally constructed in 1940 following a sit-in at the segregated Alexandria Library."

The Alexandria Black History Museum is located in the Parker-Gray Historic District, in the north-west quadrant of Old Town Alexandria. Alexandria is half-way between Washington, D.C. and Mount Vernon.

On-street parking or free parking across Wythe Street, in the parking lot behind the Charles Houston Recreation Center.

Anacostia Community Museum

"The Anacostia Community museum explores social issues impacting diverse populations of the DC metropolitan area to promote mutual understanding and strengthen community bonds."

There is free parking and admission.

Banneker-Douglass Museum

"The Banneker-Douglass Museum, named for Benjamin Banneker and Frederick Douglass, was dedicated on February 24, 1984. The original museum was housed within the former Mount Moriah African Methodist Episcopal Church in the heart of historic Annapolis. The Victorian-Gothic structure was included in the Annapolis Historic District in 1971 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973."

Freedom House Museum

"Today the building, owned by the Northern Virginia Urban League, is home to the Freedom House museum. Here, visitors stand witness to the powerful stories of the enslaved in the same space where they were once held. The original bars, bricked walls and artifacts are tangible reminders of this dark time in our nation’s history."

Frederick Douglass Historic House

"Frederick Douglass spent his life fighting for justice and equality. Born into slavery in 1818, he escaped as a young man and became a leading voice in the abolitionist movement. People everywhere still find inspiration today in his tireless struggle, brilliant words, and inclusive vision of humanity. Douglass's legacy is preserved here at Cedar Hill, where he lived his last 17 years."

There is no entrance fee. If you make a reservation to the historic house, there is a fee of $1.50 for each reserved ticket or a flat fee of $5.00 for school groups.