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Mental Health Monday: COVID's impact on children's mental health

"Mental health is one of the biggest struggles we have in the state and in the nation, and especially in children," said former pediatrician Dr. Wes Stubblefield.

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Many doctors are worried about the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on children's mental health.

"Mental health is one of the biggest struggles we have in the state and in the nation, and especially in children," said former pediatrician Dr. Wes Stubblefield.

The pandemic changed all of our worlds. One reason Stubblefield is concerned for children's mental health is because they lost out on many opportunities to learn how to socialize.

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"Many children weren't able to go to school for an extended period of time," said Stubblefield. "Children don't all learn the same way and they can't always learn in front of a computer."

With a change of environment comes other concerns, such as learning problems, academic delays and even potentially anxiety, depression and obesity.

"I don't know if schools can do more than they already are doing," said Stubblefield. "It's not that they are not doing what they can, but they are so resourced and time-limited and honestly the providers are not out there, there are just not enough people out there to see all the children for having these problems."

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Stubblefield recommends that parents check for certain signs that their children may need help, including attitude changes, loss of friendships, communication changes or if they show a change in interests.

If you don't have access to a specialist, talk with your pediatrician and they can help provide resources your child may need.

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