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Churches are turning their sanctuaries into vaccination sites

David's Temple Missionary Baptist Church wants to help provide access to vaccines in rural areas and help vaccinate the community.

TANNER, Ala — Vaccines have been available to most anyone for weeks now, but many people have yet to get the shot. 

Places like local churches want to help provide access to vaccines. In order to do this, they turn their sanctuaries into vaccine sites.

A deacon at David's Temple Missionary Baptist Church tells us why providing this access is so important, especially in rural areas.

"To my knowledge, only about less than 30% of people in the state of Alabama have been vaccinated at this time, and we want to provide some rural sites for vaccination to reach a population that probably hadn't been exposed to the inner city vaccination clinics," said Deacon Wilbert Woodruff, David's Temple Missionary Baptist Church. 

To find out where you can get vaccinated here in the Valley, click here

As of May 13, all Alabamians ages 12 and up are eligible to receive the COVID vaccine after the CDC gave the Pfizer vaccine emergency authorization for those in this age group.

“This is great and welcome news that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine will now be available for Alabamians 12 and up, offering another option for families in our state as we get back into full gear. We have seen good success so far with these safe and effective vaccines, and I encourage parents and children to consult with your pediatrician if you have any questions,” Governor Ivey said. “The vaccine is our ticket back to normal, and I continue to feel optimistic and hopeful in the positive direction we are moving in as a state.”

“If you are fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic,” the CDC says on their website.

For the most up-to-date information on side effects and the COVID-19 vaccine, visit the CDC’s website.  

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