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Boeing looks to enter new era of safety

A new report outlines how the company will rework its safety culture in the wake of the deadly 737 MAX crashes.

SEATTLE — Boeing is working to bolster its safety culture in the wake of two deadly 737 MAX crashes that forever changed one of the northwest's oldest companies.

Changes, outlined in the company's new Chief Aerospace Safety Officer Report, are meant to improve the entire safety culture and reputation of Boeing.

The changes within the company aim to improve manufacturing operations at Boeing and allow employees to more openly share concerns that may someday result in real-life problems. Also, the lines of communication between airline pilots and crews are being reworked to allow better feedback on the airplanes made by Boeing. 

"We said, what are the things we can do to really improve our safety processes," said Al Madar, Deputy Chief Safety Officer at Boeing.

Madar said the new internal program called 'Speak Up', is already showing signs of success. Since implemented, the company said it's noticed a 32% increase in employees filing internal quality and safety reports.

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"Safety has always been, something that's been very important to Boeing," Madar said. "The purpose of this is to put a very structured process in place, that's data-driven, that really takes on safety and a different way."

Unprecedented scrutiny was placed on Boeing in the wake of two deadly MAX crashes that resulted in the death of 346 passengers and crewmembers. Investigations revealed a lack of such a safety framework, which contributed to breakdowns that lead to the plane's flawed design.

Madar met with KING 5 in Boeing's Safety Promotion Center in Everett. It's a space designed to remind employees of the importance of safety, and the way past disasters have led to real safety changes on airplanes.

"The safety and success of Boeing matters," Madar said. "It matters to all of us."

   

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