x
Breaking News
More () »

WZDX

The Buzz: NASA creates necklace that reminds you not to touch your face

The PULSE pendant is worn around your neck and when you put your hands closer to your face, it will vibrate.

Don’t touch your face. Four simple words we’ve all likely heard since the start of this pandemic to help curb the spread of COVID-19. 

But if you can’t break the habit of touching your face, NASA has invented an interesting wearable to help.

Here’s the Buzz: The space agency designed a necklace to alert a user whenever their hands get close to their face.

The PULSE pendant is worn around your neck and when you put your hands closer to your face, it will vibrate.

"The haptic feedback from a vibration motor simulates a nudge, reminding the wearer to avoid touching these entryways in order to reduce potential infection," NASA said on its website. 

Since health experts warn touching your face could bring COVID-19 closer to your eyes, mouth and nose, this necklace could help curb the spread of the virus.

A 3-D printer is needed to make the necklace, but the instructions are available for free here.

New complications from COVID-19

Scientists may have discovered another complication from COVID-19. New research shows severe cases of the virus could affect patients' brains.

Here’s the Buzz: Many patients had blood clots in their brains, while others showed signs of confusion and even psychiatric conditions.

Researchers are still trying to figure out if COVID-19 is the only cause of those problems.

Broadway to return in 2021

The bright lights of Broadway will remain dark for the remainder of the year.

Here’s the Buzz: The Broadway League made the announcement Monday, saying the pandemic has forced the shutdown of 39 plays and musicals.

Returning shows will resume performances over a series of rolling dates early next year and the theaters are extending ticket refunds and exchanges through January 3.

Tickets for next year's performances are expected to go on sale in the coming weeks.

Tracking employees working from home

Although you're working from home, don't think your boss isn't keeping an eye on you.

Here’s the Buzz: Privacy experts are reminding people if you are using a company-owned computer or phone, your employer has access to all kinds of data.

Research shows since the start of the pandemic, there's been a nearly 20 percent rise in software purchased to track remote employees – including browsing history, documents and even screenshots of your desktop.